Jump to content

Reverse Logic Jack Stand Blocks for Aluminum Jack Stands

reverse logic

4 replies to this topic

#1 Fred@ReverseLogic Posted 18 February 2012 - 08:05 PM

Fred@ReverseLogic
  • Vendors
  • Vendor

  • PipPip
  • 206 posts
  • Location:Royersford, PA
The typical jack stands available at auto stores and big box stores aren't really intended to be used with BMW, Mercedes or Nissan GT-R side jack points which have a rectangular vehicle jack pocket. Reverse Logic recently introduced a multi-vehicle jack pad tool with a block that can be adapted for use with one of the many available aluminum jack stands with a flat top saddle.

These jack stands are offered by Torin, Snap-on, OTC, Griot's Garage, and Duralast. The Duralast aluminum stands from Auto Zone are no longer available. Some of the jack stands have inner tubes which are removable which provide easy access for bolting a block to the top of the stand. Others like the Torin Big Red model T43004 have a "captive" inner tube and a sealed bottom on the outer tube.

This post focuses on the Torin model since it is the most challenging one of the group on which to install the block. Items needed to convert the Torin jack stands to BMW, MB, and GT-R friendly jack stands are:

1) One pair of JB52-30-28 Jack Stand Blocks (includes two 55mm bolts) available for $31.95 at www.reverselogic.us

2) 10mm drill bit and drill press with 1/2" chuck

3) 17mm socket with long extension to reach through inner tube.

4) Drift pin and hammer or other suitable tool for removing spring loaded pins from inner jack stand tube

5) Thin plastic sheet material to retain spring loaded pins in place when tubes are separated

6) C-Clamp if using a drilling template on the jack stand saddle.

The pictures in this first post show the finished product and the bottom of the outer tube and the spring-loaded pins in the inner tube.

Attached Thumbnails

  • JS11.png
  • JS00.png

Edited by Fred@ReverseLogic, 19 March 2014 - 06:03 PM.




#2 Fred@ReverseLogic Posted 18 February 2012 - 08:11 PM

Fred@ReverseLogic
  • Vendors
  • Vendor

  • PipPip
  • 206 posts
  • Location:Royersford, PA
Removing captive inner tube from Torin jack stand....

Here's the steps to separate the inner and outer tubes.

1) Pull the tubes apart until the bottom most hole is aligned with the hole in the outer tube.

2) Rotate the tubes 90˚. The reason for this is that you want to position the spring loaded pins so they don't have to be dragged past the holes in the outer tube which are likely to have burrs on the inside wall of the tube.

3) The next step is to slip some thin pieces of plastic film between the inner and outer tubes in line with the holes in the inner tube. You need a piece on each side of the tube. I used pieces about 30mm by 150mm by .007" thick. You can also use a piece of smooth heavy paper. Some junk mail you have kicking around may work. The plastic is better since it won't tear and jam between the tubes like a piece of paper might. Slide the film inside the tube until it hits up against the spring loaded pins.

4) Push the plastic film and inner tube into the outer tube so that the film straddles the groove on the inside of the outer tube. This groove is about 2mm to 3mm deep and about 19mm wide. The bottom edge of the groove tapers to the inside diameter of the tube so that the pins are pushed in when the tubes are slid together.

5) Hold the plastic in place relative to the outer tube and pull the inner tube out. The plastic straddles the groove and the spring loaded pins remain compressed until you separate the tubes.

Attached Thumbnails

  • JS01.png
  • JS02.png
  • JS03.png
  • JS04.png
  • JS05.png
  • JS06.png
  • JS07.png




#3 Fred@ReverseLogic Posted 18 February 2012 - 08:16 PM

Fred@ReverseLogic
  • Vendors
  • Vendor

  • PipPip
  • 206 posts
  • Location:Royersford, PA
Removing spring loaded pin and mounting block...

You can press the spring loaded pin assembly out of the inner tube using a vise or tapping it out with a suitable pin and hammer. I used a 1/4" socket to push the pin out of the first wall of the tube by compressing the socket and tube in a vise. You need to provide a place for the pin to exit the opposite side. Once I had the assembly partly out, I used a 3/8" diameter pin to tap the pins out the rest of the way.

Drilling the 10mm hole in the saddle could be difficult without a drill press. You can mark the center of the hole in the saddle with a center punch and then drill a pilot hole and pregressively larger diameter holes until you reach 10mm. I opted to make a drilling fixture and clamped it in place with a 4" C-Clamp and a couple of blocks of wood. The soft wood compensates for the slight difference in the length of the drilling template and the width of the saddle.

I removed the drill press table and supported the inner tube in the drill press table arm. Using the template I was able to start with the 10mm drill bit without struggling to keep it from walking off center.

The saddle is about 35mm thick. An M10x1.5 55mm long bolt can be inserted from the bottom of the inner tube and tightened using a 17mm socket with a long ratchet extension.

You can reinstall the spring loaded pin if you want to retain the captive inner tube feature. But then it would be more work to remove the blocks if they were not needed for other cars in your stable. It's also possible to use an M10 threaded stud in the bottom of the block and just place it into the hole in the saddle rather than bolting the block to the saddle. In that case you may be able to skip the steps for disassembling the tubes and removing the spring loaded pins.

Attached Thumbnails

  • JS08.png
  • JS09.png
  • JS10.png




#4 Fred@ReverseLogic Posted 18 February 2012 - 08:23 PM

Fred@ReverseLogic
  • Vendors
  • Vendor

  • PipPip
  • 206 posts
  • Location:Royersford, PA
Using the modified jack stands....

Jack stand manufacturers pretty much recommend using jack stands in pairs. Not one, not three, not four, just two.

Chock the two wheels that remain on the ground.

Use the jack stands in the lowest possible position for a given job. The lower they are the more stable they are.

After the blocks are installed it's easier to raise the jack stands into the jack points then it is to lower the car onto the jack stands. Actually, you have to do a little of both. If you raise the car high, and position the jack stands with say 3" between the jack stand saddle and the jack point, it's unlikely that the jack points will line up with the block on the jack stand as the car is lowered. It's much better to raise the jack stands to within a 1/4" of the bottom of the jack point pocket and then just lower the car that final 1/4". You may need to try this a few times before you get the car positioned to the correct height. The jack stands have to be low enough to clear the rim of the jack point and then they can only be adjusted in 25mm increments.

The Torin T43004 jack stand is a little more flexible than the other models since the bolt attaching the outer tube to the base does not interfere with the inner tube. In effect there is one more lower position on the Torin brand. Since it can be used without the locking pins. This comes in handy when you are raising the jack stand into the jack point pocket. It means that you can use the stands with the pin in the lowest position whereas the other brands of these aluminum jack stands can only be used in the second lowest position.



#5 Fred@ReverseLogic Posted 01 March 2012 - 08:41 PM

Fred@ReverseLogic
  • Vendors
  • Vendor

  • PipPip
  • 206 posts
  • Location:Royersford, PA
Torin T43004 aluminum jack stands
Reverse Logic is now a reseller for the Torin T43004 jack stands. Beginning mid-March we will be selling the jack stands with our JB52-30-28 jack stand blocks mounted to the jack stands. The delivered price for the jack stands including the blocks will be about $110.





Reply to this topic



  

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users