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Who still uses Nitrogen in tires?


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Poll: Do you still fill your tires with Nitrogen?

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Do you still fill your tires with Nitrogen?

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#1 NoSoupForU

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 01:33 PM

I was wondering if owners here still bother to fill their tires with nitrogen? I remember seeing a report somewhere that even when going to places like Costco, they found that the "nitrogen" they use is actually just normal air.

#2 EvilGT-R

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 01:46 PM

In for responses

#3 BDASooner

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 02:43 PM

Nope.
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#4 NoSoupForU

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 03:00 PM

So if we suspect that our tires have normal air in them. How hard would it be to purge all the air and fill with Nitrogen? Is it even possible to completely purge all of the old air?

#5 Sub Driver

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 03:28 PM

Nitrogen is pointless, a marketing gimmick IMO. Air is 79% nitrogen. No benefit other than it may take a little longer to leak out because the nitrogen molecule is slightly bigger than oxygen (2.6% bigger).
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#6 Rimola

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 03:38 PM

Sub Driver's response sounds intelligent. Ever since i put on my HRE's i have just used normal air. Havent really bothered to look into nitrogen yet.
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#7 GODZ!LLA

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 04:33 PM

Normal air--I thought the N+ was supposed to fluctuate less--first cold weather and the sensors showed low pressure--plain air from then on and it's free in my garage!

#8 shawnhayes

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 05:15 PM

...

Edited by shawnhayes, 02 September 2013 - 08:41 PM.


#9 descartesfool

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 05:43 PM

Air for me. I am always checking pressures at the track and adding or removing air depending on air and tire temps.

#10 CR-8-10_GTR

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 06:22 PM

My Nissan Service dealer has a machine that purges the tires and fills w/nitrogen all tires at the same time...
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#11 jaspergtr

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 06:53 PM

Nitrogen whenever I can get it. The increase in tire pressure on the track is slightly smaller, and the air loss over time is smaller.

It ain't much, but at 8$ per tire, it ain't high finance.

Shawn

This. On track, the tire pressures are slightly more stable, therefore the handling characteristics are more consistent from lap to lap. For street driving, I believe this is irrelevant.

But $8? Nissan dealerships must give this to us for free... ????
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#12 shawnhayes

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 06:56 PM

...

Edited by shawnhayes, 02 September 2013 - 08:41 PM.


#13 shawnhayes

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 06:59 PM

...

Edited by shawnhayes, 02 September 2013 - 08:41 PM.


#14 Tex2014

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 07:00 PM

The one issue you may want to consider is moisture. Compressed air in usually hot due to compression. You now have compressed air which holds more water , and you have hot air which holds more water, (water will drop out of the compressed air as it cools, but it still holds more water due to the increased pressure). Now inflate your tires with the hot compressed air. As the air enters your tires it expands (110 psi to 20 psi) which cools it and obviously decompresses it. Now all that extra water is in your tires. The water, now in your tires, can corrode your pressure sensors, and your alloy wheels.

Water separators in the air lines remove only water in excess of 100% humidity, the air entering your tires is still saturated at 110 psi.

Also, compressed air contains sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, carbonic acid, ozone, and any other pollutant you can think of. All of which will attack your wheels and tires.

#15 Grunt0322

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 07:15 PM

The one issue you may want to consider is moisture. Compressed air in usually hot due to compression. You now have compressed air which holds more water , and you have hot air which holds more water, (water will drop out of the compressed air as it cools, but it still holds more water due to the increased pressure). Now inflate your tires with the hot compressed air. As the air enters your tires it expands (110 psi to 20 psi) which cools it and obviously decompresses it. Now all that extra water is in your tires. The water, now in your tires, can corrode your pressure sensors, and your alloy wheels.

Water separators in the air lines remove only water in excess of 100% humidity, the air entering your tires is still saturated at 110 psi.

Also, compressed air contains sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, carbonic acid, ozone, and any other pollutant you can think of. All of which will attack your wheels and tires.


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#16 Pregeeter13

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 08:20 PM

Shawn...what size are/were your sport cups? I didn't think they made them in 20s so may I assume you're running 19s and if so what's been your experience? I ran them on my Audi and Porsche with great respect and am somewhat amazed that Michelin has turned their back on our GTR stock sizes. Thoughts?

#17 descartesfool

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 08:28 PM

I hardly ever change the pressure on my street tires, unless I have a small leak, and they might still have nitrogen in them from the dealer since I never had a flat. But on the track, my R compounds go up in temperature a lot and in pressure by 10 to 12 psi (say from 24 psi cold to 36 psi hot). And each tire is different, and it changes over the course of the day as track and air temperature go up, so one needs to adjust pressures up and down to optimize tire temps across the tread, plus the amount of tread on the tires changes the pressure rise. the more tread on a new set of R compounds, the more they heat up due to tire squirm (unless you shave them or run Hoosiers or equivalent). The ultra small change in tire pressure due to water vapor in the tire is very, very small compared to the 10-12 psi change from cold to hot, so I just don't think it's worth thinking about using nitrogen at the track unless you're in a pro race team. And I set tire temps with a racing gage that measures to 0.2 psi, and can tell changes in pressure sometimes as small as 0.6 psi based on handling changes. Plus you are just never, ever going to get nitrogen at the track unless you bring your own tanks in your rig.

Here is an interesting read from Toyo tires on what they think about tire inflation using nitrogen:

http://www.toyotires...arch-result.htm

"The advantages of nitrogen gas inflation are derived mostly from its impermeability through

rubber. This characteristic of nitrogen gas can keep the original inflation pressure for a longer

time than air. In addition, the absence of oxygen and water (in the case of dry nitrogen) prevents

the tire components, as well as the wheel, from oxidization and rust. Improved integrity of the

steel and rubber materials will result in better retreadability. This can be a big benefit, especially

for truck/bus tires.

At this point we have little factual data at hand to positively promote nitrogen gas inflation,

but there are no negative aspects either, from the standpoint of tire performance."

Here is what Tirerack says:

http://www.tirerack.....jsp?techid=191

"Overall, inflating tires with nitrogen won't hurt them and may provide some minimal benefits.
Is it worth it? If you go someplace that provides free nitrogen with new tires, why not? Additionally we’ve seen some service providers offering reasonable prices of about $5 per tire (including periodic adjustments for the life of the tire) to a less reasonable $10 per tire (with additional costs for subsequent pressure adjustments) or more as part of a service contract, which we believe exceeds the value of nitrogen’s benefit.
Rather than pay extra for nitrogen, most drivers would be better off buying an accurate tire pressure gauge and checking and adjusting their tire pressures regularly."

Here is what a study by Consumer Reports found:
http://news.consumer...-nitrogen-.html

"The test started on September 20, 2006 and the final measurements were taken on September 20, 2007. The results show nitrogen does reduce pressure loss over time, but the reduction is only a 1.3 psi difference from air-filled tires. The average loss of air-filled tires was just 3.5 psi from the initial 30 pressure setting. Nitrogen-filled tires lost an average of 2.2 psi from the initial 30 psi setting. More important, all tires lost air pressure regardless of the inflation medium, so consumers should check their tires' air pressure routinely. No evaluation was done to assess the aging claim.
Bottom line: Overall, consumers can use nitrogen and might enjoy the slight improvement in air retention provided, but it's not a substitute for regular inflation checks."


#18 shanet

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 09:48 PM

mine still have it in them from factory. I was thinking of letting it all out and filling with air. I wanted to lower my tires to 20lbs at the track but their is no where close to here that offers nitrogen to put back in them.

#19 shawnhayes

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 05:16 AM

...

Edited by shawnhayes, 02 September 2013 - 08:41 PM.


#20 forty-two

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 10:47 AM

Man, I can't find those "286"s anywhere, lol.

FWIW - Costco has free nitrogen.
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