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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

New member here from the Rx-7 world with a couple questions. From my experience suspension and braking upgrades usually take priority when first tuning your ride. My question is, is there any options for upgrading the GTR's suspension without compromising the ability to use the dash switches. I understand that you can use a coilover sleeve kit such as Cobb or KW and achieve this. What about these setups allow you to use the dash switches (ie. Comfort and Normal mode) but not a full coilover set. Also, second question, what other upgrades do you guys find beneficial for upgrading the suspenions on these cars? I am under the impression that a lot of you find that sway bar upgrades make a large difference, so what else can I look into?

Secondly.... Brakes:
I feel that the stock calipers on the GTR are more than sufficent, I believe 6 port in the front and 4 port in the back? (I could be making that up)... But as far as rotors, lines and pads go, what would you guys suggest I research into?

Wheels and Tires:
I am just wondering what kind of pros/cons you guys have experience by going with 21" Wheels versus the stock 20"?

I guess I should also state that this car will be used mainly on the street and for mountain carving, with track use maybe 4-6 times a year.

If anyone could give me some insight or even links to threads that I may research would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance and please know that i'm truley excited about finally becoming part of the GTR communtiy.
 

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Welcome

All of the topics you mentioned have been discussed thoroughly, just search for the details.

You are correct, suspension upgrades make the most sense for most GTR owners to balance out the performance for street use although the stock car is plenty capable for street duty. Unless you are pushing your car in the mountains it's not really an issue for most drivers.

Before you make any changes I always recommend driving school at least to the intermediate level such as with EVO driving school or similar with professional level instructors.

Suspension-
Shocks- usually keep the stock ones if you can so that you can use the dash controls for comfort, normal and R mode but in stock configuration there is hardly any difference at all.
Springs- The least expensive option is lowering springs such as Eibach, Tanabe, Swift Sport and others. You can control the shocks via dash settings and comfort mode tends to work better but ride height is fixed to about 1" drop for the Swifts and less for the others, most are progressive springs about the same stiffness as stock.
Coilovers- full coilovers that are fully adjustable would be best but also very costly and will remove your dash controls and void your suspension warranty. You can also do coilover sleeves and that would retain the shocks and the dash controls but they are a little noisy. You can adjust ride height which is nice.
Front and rear swaybars- the more adjustable the better but there are different approaches to this equation, some sets are pricey some less so, some are very stiff and others much softer in settings. It doesn't really matter that much for street use as long as you get the settings front to rear to your liking. Bars are essential on the track, you may feel it on the mountains at speed in turns.
Endlinks- adjustable and stiffer than stock are helpful, various sources
Camber- adjustable upgrade parts and kits for more camber front and rear is possible but more negative will mean more tire wear on the inside edges which is already a problem with stock settings for alignment. More negative in front is great for fast cornering up to about -2.4 degrees (possible with just lowering springs) to -3.0 degrees. Rear camber about -1.5 to -2.0 degrees is adequate.
Alignment- more aggressive is tougher on tire wear but helps responsiveness and handling. Front toe to zero to slight toe out 1/16 to 1/8", rear toe to zero to toe in 1/8" for more stability.
Tower Strut bar- comes with the 2012 GTR and can be added to other years but very costly

Brakes- for street use it's fine, just use up your stock pads first but for track then something that handles heat better would be nice.
Brake fluid- you can either upgrade fluid to something that handles heat better or regularly change brake fluid to keep it fresh
Brake squeak- any track pad is going to be noisy, to keep the stock pads less noisy you can use ceramic brake lubricant
Brake rotors- can be upgraded, lots of options for not that much cost but good to use up your stock ones first
Brake lines - not that high priority
Brake calipers- you're right on your estimates- they are fine for street use.

Wheels
20" is stock but can be wider especially in the front to reduce understeer and in the back to take a wider tire.
21" is OK but tire sizes are not that good for best tire choices, all are non runflats, wheels tend to be heavy and tires too
18" is the smallest wheel size that will fit over the brake calipers but is limited on tire choices for street use- better for track.
19" is possible for street use and will clear the brakes, all non runflats, wheels tend to be lighter

Tires-
Besides the stock runflats (dunlop summer tires pricey but a little faster on the track), non runflat tires will tend to ride smoother, weigh less and cost less per tire.
Michelin Pilot Super Sport is a good one and you can choose a size that will fit on both front and rears- you need to keep the tire diameter the same front and rear to work with the transmission. Staggered tire sizes are fine just match the tire diameter to about 28" which is stock.

An alternative is a tougher R compound tire that can be run on the street and at the track like the Toyo R888. In 20" sizes it runs a little taller than stock.

Use the best tire you can find as the tires are a key component to the overall handling and traction capabilities of the GTR. You can find some cheap Max Summer tires but unless you are careful you can easily hit the limit of the tires and risk loosing control.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This write-up is exactly what I was looking for. I have been skimming through the forum but didn't exactly know what to type in the search bar for the best results. Thanks AutoX!
 

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The switches really don't do much, so I don't think that you should lock yourself to them. You have much more adjustability with a real set of coil overs. http://www.2009gtr.com/search/label/Suspension



Brakes. Brakes are one of my favorite subjects. - The stock brakes crack around the holes. The stock brake pads crack under heavy use- http://www.2009gtr.com/search/label/Brakes .



A favored upgrade are the STILLEN/AP Curved vane rotors in either J hook or slotted. They last most guys about 5 times as long as a factory rotor.

Some basics/buyers guide -http://www.2009gtr.com/2010/12/used-nissan-gt-r-buyers-guide-2009-2011.html

Wheel/tire fitment - http://www.2009gtr.com/2011/09/nissan-gt-r-wheel-and-tire-fitment.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sean,

Those write-ups are simply brillant. They pretty much answer all of the novice questions I have so far about the GT-R. The information I find when using the search feature is rather detailed and I find myself lost before I really get started.

Thank you for this, greatly appreciated!
 

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I have installed the KW coilover sleeve kit, lowered the car a bit and had it corner-balanced. Since doing so, I actually can feel a difference between the three suspension settings on the dash, which is odd since the springs are stiffer than stock. The kit doesn't make any noise, either. The sleeve kit combined with Stillen sways (medium setting front and full soft rear) and Dunlop SP600 runflats 285 front and rear has made the car handle very neutral. Understeer is gone and power-on oversteer is not an issue.

Regarding brakes, whenever you decide to replace the rotors I would recommend AP Racing rotors. They are less expensive than OEM and last much longer. If you want a pad that is a good compromise between a track and street pad, I understand the Endless MX72's are the way to go. There are a lot of choices for fluid. I used to use Motul RBF600 but changed this past January to Castrol SRF. If yours is a 2009, you might want to consider Stillen stainless brake lines, as well.
 

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I have installed the KW coilover sleeve kit, lowered the car a bit and had it corner-balanced. Since doing so, I actually can feel a difference between the three suspension settings on the dash, which is odd since the springs are stiffer than stock. The kit doesn't make any noise, either. The sleeve kit combined with Stillen sways (medium setting front and full soft rear) and Dunlop SP600 runflats 285 front and rear has made the car handle very neutral. Understeer is gone and power-on oversteer is not an issue.

Regarding brakes, whenever you decide to replace the rotors I would recommend AP Racing rotors. They are less expensive than OEM and last much longer. If you want a pad that is a good compromise between a track and street pad, I understand the Endless MX72's are the way to go. There are a lot of choices for fluid. I used to use Motul RBF600 but changed this past January to Castrol SRF. If yours is a 2009, you might want to consider Stillen stainless brake lines, as well.
I am doing the APR stud upgrades next week and figured might be a good time to have coilovers added also, how do you like your KW's, Do you recall the install time for all 4 corners of the coilovers as well as the corner balancing?
 
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