Nissan GT-R Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been Daily Driving MY 2012 for about 5 months now - and I love this car.
Having said that, we've been getting some heavy rain out here in the NE and I have some concerns.
It seems that whenever I cross standing water I feel the front end lift a little, and at times the car feels quite loose in the wet.
So right now, with heavy rain and standing water I am a very cautious driver out there - although that might be smart behavior :)
Just for reference, my previous car was an Audi B6 S4 running Continental All Seasons or PS2s.
Is this car a little unstable on standing water or does it just have a different feel to my previous car?
Would love to hear your experience,
BP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,640 Posts
With my Dunlop's my car will completely hydroplane over any standing water. During heavy rain fall, I can hardly maintain speed on the highway. Granted, this is over STANDING water not simply wet roads. The stock tires do not evacuate water well, you can tell even just by looking at the tread patterning. The compound however grips even under wet conditions fairly well. If that makes sense...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I just got back from a trip down to the Dragon and I had to drive over 11 hours in nonstop rain, often in downpours with minimal visibility, due to tropical storm Emily. My 2009 GT-R had almost brand new OEM Bridgestone Potenza RE070R RFTs (about 1000 miles at that point) and I was amazed at how fast and stable the car was in the rain when NO standing water is present. It's pretty easy to cruise at 70-85 in a shower or light rainfall, but near the very end of my journey I ran into some seriously drainage challenged stretches of highway at the height of the storm, and the car would lift, slide sideways and generally do its best to scare you sh!tless at any speed over 45-50. At that point I was the one holding up traffic as average sedans, SUVs and min-vans were blowing by me in those conditions. There is very little control on these tires in even a little bit of standing water when you approach 50mph.

I'm not sure why, but I think it has to do with the tire tread and the sheer massive contact patch of the stock GT-R tire. I don't know the physics of it, but it seems to lift and hydroplane faster than a narrower tire would.

When the tire is actually touching wet ground it remains incredibly sticky, but when it starts to float all bets are off mighty fast. I found my car to handle much better in heavy downpours when I use Snow mode. That mode seems to handle the odd "floating" tire much better than normal mode. This is especially apparent when accelerating or braking through standing water. When you slam into standing water it will still get unstable, but the car will sort itself out pretty quick as long as you keep calm and don't brake, accelerate or turn suddenly at the wrong time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,640 Posts
I just got back from a trip down to the Dragon and I had to drive over 11 hours in nonstop rain, often in downpours with minimal visibility, due to tropical storm Emily. My 2009 GT-R had almost brand new OEM Bridgestone Potenza RE070R RFTs (about 1000 miles at that point) and I was amazed at how fast and stable the car was in the rain when NO standing water is present. It's pretty easy to cruise at 70-85 in a shower or light rainfall, but near the very end of my journey I ran into some seriously drainage challenged stretches of highway at the height of the storm, and the car would lift, slide sideways and generally do its best to scare you sh!tless at any speed over 45-50. At that point I was the one holding up traffic as average sedans, SUVs and min-vans were blowing by me in those conditions. There is very little control on these tires in even a little bit of standing water when you approach 50mph.

I'm not sure why, but I think it has to do with the tire tread and the sheer massive contact patch of the stock GT-R tire. I don't know the physics of it, but it seems to lift and hydroplane faster than a narrower tire would.

When the tire is actually touching wet ground it remains incredibly sticky, but when it starts to float all bets are off mighty fast. I found my car to handle much better in heavy downpours when I use Snow mode. That mode seems to handle the odd "floating" tire much better than normal mode. This is especially apparent when accelerating or braking through standing water. When you slam into standing water it will still get unstable, but the car will sort itself out pretty quick as long as you keep calm and don't brake, accelerate or turn suddenly at the wrong time.
This is exactly what I experienced and was trying to explain as well haha. Obviously a wider tire just acts like a surfboard over the water so we are at a natural disadvantage compared to average cars in standing water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
990 Posts
When the tire is actually touching wet ground it remains incredibly sticky, but when it starts to float all bets are off mighty fast. I found my car to handle much better in heavy downpours when I use Snow mode. That mode seems to handle the odd "floating" tire much better than normal mode. This is especially apparent when accelerating or braking through standing water. When you slam into standing water it will still get unstable, but the car will sort itself out pretty quick as long as you keep calm and don't brake, accelerate or turn suddenly at the wrong time.
That makes sense. Snow mode or save mode controls powertrain torque on slippery surfaces by making the engine response less sensitive to accelerator pedal changes. This means the tires are less likely to break traction due to the torque being smoothed out. Thanks for reporting this finding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,862 Posts
If you're in water on a somewhat regular basis the optional Dunlop all seasons may be worth a spin when it comes time to change rubber; they have a much more open tread pattern which should be significantly better in light standing water...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Craig - these are the Dunlop all seasons.

All - I did go into Save mode last night on the drive and it did yield a less scary ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
990 Posts
Also worth trying on slippery surfaces is comfort mode to get a longer suspension travel to minimize traction loss on bumpier roads. Great feedback in this thread!
 

·
Caretaker of GODZIRA!
Joined
·
2,679 Posts
I've been Daily Driving MY 2012 for about 5 months now - and I love this car.
Having said that, we've been getting some heavy rain out here in the NE and I have some concerns.
It seems that whenever I cross standing water I feel the front end lift a little, and at times the car feels quite loose in the wet.
So right now, with heavy rain and standing water I am a very cautious driver out there - although that might be smart behavior :)
Just for reference, my previous car was an Audi B6 S4 running Continental All Seasons or PS2s.
Is this car a little unstable on standing water or does it just have a different feel to my previous car?
Would love to hear your experience,
BP
All Seasons don't excel in any season, they are just adequate in any given season. They are, after all, an ultra high performance all season tire. If you want a tire that excels in the rain, then get a dedicated rain tire (if you can find one in GTR size, which I highly doubt).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,598 Posts
i hear Blizzak are night and day for bad conditions
I can't say for the GT-R, but in the 17 inch 235mm wide variant, they are FRICKING AWESOME in all conditions. A lot of tread squirm in the dry, but sticky sticky sticky in bad conditions, and not bad except for the squirm in the dry.

Shawn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Also worth trying on slippery surfaces is comfort mode to get a longer suspension travel to minimize traction loss on bumpier roads. Great feedback in this thread!
Yes, I forgot to mention that in addition to activating snow mode, I also switched to comfort mode for this reason. This combination works best in extremely heavy rain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,626 Posts
Yes, I forgot to mention that in addition to activating snow mode, I also switched to comfort mode for this reason. This combination works best in extremely heavy rain.
This is great to know. We don't get much pouring standing rain in So Cal, but it does occasionally happen. I'll keep this in mind. Thanks for posting!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,172 Posts
I never found the Dunlop all seasons to be superior to the Bridgestones in the rain. I think that both are reasonably effective. The trade-off on the all seasons is longer tread life with some sacrifice of dry surface performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Golzilla - I'm normally in R-Comf-- for DD, and in very heavy rain (now) in Save-Comf--.
And apart from keeping it below the 50 mph perceived limit - any more practical advice out there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
990 Posts
Interesting comment about Dunlop all seasons vs Bridgestones; hopefully, others can provide more feedback. The Bridgestones certainly are not bad in the rain, but the grooves on the Dunlop all seasons might suggest they are at least marginally better.

I would say what's more important than the tire and settings is the actual driving style. Most people already know it but it's worth saying anyway. The tips are not necessarily conducive to racing, it's primarily for safety on the streets. You do not need to observe all of them at once or all the time, it depends on the situation. In a blizzard for example, you might need to observe most of them.

The boring tips that can save you:
- Avoid sudden movements such as steering or acceleration & braking that could upset the balance of the car. For example, it would be better to slow down in a straight line before taking a turn and slowly accelerate out when you have straightened. Braking and turning at the same time upsets the car more. It's similar to the racing concept of slow-in fast-out except you aren't really stepping on the gas as hard.
- Be observant of road conditions. The types of turns to look out for are tight, long sweepers, or opposite inclines. Small bumps, curbs, holes, or other objects can jolt the car causing a slip. Changes in elevation and surface such as railroad crossings and bridge humps.
- Leave more room between cars and be aware of others around you in front, back, and sides. On some narrow roads with multiple lanes, it's better to avoid driving beside other vehicles except for short durations to pass. That means you are driving sort of staggered.
- Wider tires are more likely to hydroplane, so avoid standing water such as might be on the side of the road. Often one of the lanes might have more water due to drainage problems.
- Be more visible so that others can take evasive action if you get into trouble. You can be more visible by turning on the parking lights and perhaps the headlights, but make sure it's not on high beam.
- Be a more defensive driver and perceive ahead. This means assume others might do something stupid so be prepared with the brakes and have escape routes. To avoid having to slam on the brakes, sometimes it's better to slow down by applying the brakes early.
- Avoid blowing by others, try to pass them about 5 mph faster and let them know of your intentions. In some situations such as passing a semi trailer truck or narrowing of the road coming up, use your judgment if it's best to move out of danger sooner. Be aware when hitting standing water, trucks can displace a lot of water such that if the spray hits your car and in combination with wind or slippery conditions, your car might start to wiggle.
- Keep all your windows clean. If you've got bugs on the windshield, the wipers can smear them. At night with oncoming headlights causing a hazy effect, your visibility can be greatly reduced. Ensure you have enough good windshield fluid. A good clean micro fiber cloth and quick detailing spray in the trunk can be useful to wipe the bugs off before it rains. If the window fogs up, don't forget to use the heater or A/C as per the situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,640 Posts
All great tips and just for the record, my car is on the Dunlop Sport Maxxx GT600.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Standing water and GTR do not mix, I wrote my previous R35 off already due to standing water (on the Bridgestones), would have thought the A/S are better at resisting hydroplaning but either way I take it easy in the rain now and yes, that means holding up traffic as well if necessary, and here what can happen when you mix GTR, wet road and no traction control:

http://www.youtube.c.../21/YgtBEoDXGuE
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top