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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lets just say that one had Cobb installed on their vehicle and then needed to take it in for service. If it's uninstalled- can the dealership tell that it was once installed? Is this possible?

thanks
meek
 

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COBB Tuning Firmware Engineer (Hacker)
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Lets just say that one had Cobb installed on their vehicle and then needed to take it in for service. If it's uninstalled- can the dealership tell that it was once installed? Is this possible?

thanks
meek
The dealership will not know, but if they pull the info from the blackbox and send it to Nissan they will know.

Joe
 

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Is there something specific how Nissan can prove that COBB was installed?
What if I say no - COBB was never installed on my car. What is COBB?
What do they exactly see when they read the data from the blackbox? If it's max psi, I can say, I have no idea, something was wrong and my car let turbine make higher boost...
You get the point...
 

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i really hate the blackbox..

what other cars have this?

When i ran COBB on my 335i, i was able to easily reset the codes and the dealer would never know..
 

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How can they prove it just wasn't a faulty boost actuator contributing to high readings?
 

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That's exactly my point...
AFAIK, In theory, if there is a problem with the blow off valve, boost could get to higher levels too...
If I understand correctly Nissan will know the Cobb has been installed because they can see the firmware has been flashed. So while the approach of denial might work with the dealer it wouldn't work with Nissan. Joe, feel free to correct me.
 

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COBB Tuning Firmware Engineer (Hacker)
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If I understand correctly Nissan will know the Cobb has been installed because they can see the firmware has been flashed. So while the approach of denial might work with the dealer it wouldn't work with Nissan. Joe, feel free to correct me.
As far as I understand it you are correct.

Joe
 
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i was told by a GT-R tech that the ECU records even when you hook up an outside device such as an OBD-II code reader. how much info it logs i don't know.
 

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GT-R tech told me that Nissan Japan knows every time I even farted in the car...yeah that's how much data it pulls and it must have a lot of memory cause I fart a lot.....
 

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This is an interesting conversation. In the US at least, independent shops have access to flash the ECM/TCM. So while Nissan can prove its been flashed or boost has spiked, I'd be curious to find out if they can prove WHO flashed it. Once a stock flash has been put back on, its a LOT harder for them to know specifically what was on there prior. A lot of times dealers find this out by putting you on the spot and getting you to admit you had a reflash.

-Linc
 

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Never admit anything to a dealer or anyone for that matter.

All GM vehicles have had black boxes since the late 90's primarily used for safety improvements (ie. Dual stage air bags). Overwhelming majority of vehicles have black boxes these days.

Knowing Your Rights
The data on a recorder is generally considered to be the car owner's personal property. Just as law enforcement can't access data on your computer without a search warrant, it can't access your car's EDR without one either. Attorneys and insurance companies can't typically access or use the data in a court case without the car owner's consent.

"In most states, the current vehicle owner, or their legal representative, can give or withhold permission to download EDR data," according to an FAQ on the Harris Web site. "Courts can subpoena EDR data through court orders and some states collect data under their existing laws governing crash investigations."

And you should check your automobile insurance as well as insurance policies can contain an "Agreement to Cooperate" clause. Such language allows an insurer access to EDR data if it wants it. However, some states have statutes that override these provisions. When a vehicle is sold, the EDR data becomes the property of the new owner.

That means that if a car is in a crash and is deemed a total loss by an insurance company, the insurer now owns the vehicle. The insurance company can then access the data on the EDR and could possibly use it in legal proceedings against the former owner, he says.
 
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