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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Copper is an interesting choice. With such high thermal conductivity, won't it soak up all the exhaust heat and then cook the sensor like the copper pots and pans they sell on TV? Just wondering......
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The OEM sensor does have a similar heat sink (though not copper):
Automotive lighting Tool Machine Nickel Metal


On other platforms, I've used a piece of copper sheet like the below for a heat sink solving a dead wideband O2 sensor (AEM EUGO) every few months.

Wood Musical instrument Tool Plumbing Hardwood


I do wonder how effective these supposed heat sinks are, now I'm thinking about how I could test!
 

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Not to get into semantics, but I’d call this a heat shield versus a heat sink.

The oem shield is steel which has relatively low thermal conductivity. Isn’t it only on one side as well? I wonder what drove Nissan to install that on the one side. They wouldn’t have spent the money If they didn’t think they needed it. Though all of us with aftermarket downpipes don’t have it anymore. Yet without cats in the dp, maybe don’t need the shield….etc etc…
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've had 2 cars with aftermarket wideband systems that routinely killed their sensors, in both cases the (different) company's support blamed too much heat as the culprit! Once a heat sink was added, the failures seem to stop.

Several manufacturers make products advertised as heat sinks to draw heat away from the sensor, supposedly keeping it cooler.


 
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